Sitara's Spicy Carailli

24 Apr 2015
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Carailli anyone? Studies say its very good for you but the taste is indeed an acquired one for many persons. We found this recipe in Carolyn Ali's Stories and Recipes from the The Indian Dancer and wanted to share it with you.
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Carailli anyone? Studies say its very good for you but the taste is indeed an acquired one for many persons.  We found this recipe in Carolyn Ali's Stories and Recipes from the The Indian Dancer and wanted to share it with you.  It uses and apple and some other interesting ingredients. We invite you to try it!

INGREDIENTS

3 medium carailli (seeds removed and cut in rings)

1 meduim carrot (shredded)

1 apple (shredded)

1 tbs curry powder

1/2 tesp roasted, ground geera (cumin)

1 medium onion (diced)

3 cloves garlic (chrushed)

salt, pepper and ginger to taste

1 tbs cooking oil

METHOD

1. Make a paste by adding a little water to the curry powder, saffron and geera, set aside

2. Heat cooking oil, add onion and cook until soft. Add garlic, pepper and ginger, stir.

3. Add curry paste, stir and cook for 2-3 mins.

4. Add carailli, apple and carrot. Add salt, cover and allow to cook until almost done, stirring occasionally.

5. Remove cover and allow to dry down a little

 

ENJOY!

 

About Carailli

Momordica Charantia, Carailli to us trinis is also known as bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash or balsam-pear. It is a tropical and subtropical vine of the family Cucurbitaceae, widely grown in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean for its edible fruit, which is extremely bitter. There are many varieties that differ substantially in the shape and bitterness of the fruit. 

Based on some scientific studies, Carailli has a number of uses that are thought to be beneficial; including cancer prevention, treatment of diabetes, fever and infections. While it has shown some potential clinical activity in laboratory experiments, "further studies are required to recommend its use". With regards to the use of Carailli for diabetes, several studies have demonstrated a hypoglycemic effect of concentrated bitter melon extracts depending on the manner consumed.

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