Kitchen Layout 101

7 Nov 2014
Print
You’ve decided to commit to a Kitchen Renovation. Before you begin selecting appliances, tiles and cabinet doors you must first explore what floor plan will suit your needs best. A Kitchen layout will make or break the functionally of your kitchen. To assist you in those decisions we unveil the four most common Kitchen Layouts.
10366166_714493595288548_360118120916595263_n.jpg
Single Line

This layout is ideal for small open concept spaces. Mostly found in small single person apartments.

PROS
This layout has a small footprint because it only requires one wall. It allows for an open floor plan that easily flows into the living space, which makes your space great for entertaining.

CONS
The ideal wall for this style of kitchen should be uninterrupted, free of windows and doors, so that you can maximize on space. If the kitchen is already designated to a wall with a window you may lose some storage but on the upside if you are not much of a cook the natural light may be a better feature.

EXPERT ADVICE
If you have enough space for an island this would be a great addition to this type of layout. The island would be great for prep and double as a buffet surface for entertaining.

U Shaped

Boasting three walls of cabinetry, this is arguably one of the most popular layouts. Once you have enough floor place you should seriously consider this layout as it offers ample storage and prep space.

PROS
You will find that storage is not an issue at all and that zones are clearly distinguished in this type of layout. This layout lends itself well to an eat in kitchen concept with an added peninsula.

CONS
Carefully consider the size of an island, this layout can be restricted if the kitchen island is too big or the wrong size.

L-Shaped with Island

An efficient style layout would explain this layout best. With two walls of cabinetry and an island the use of space is well thought out and provides the most counter space.
PROS
An excellent choice for families and homeowners that enjoy entertaining. In open concept living spaces an island can be the divider to differentiate living and kitchen areas. The Island provides fantastic storage while multi tasking as prep and presentation surface for parties.

CONS
This is the largest “footprint” of all the layout options. Consider your space and floor plan well before signing off on this option.

Galley

The galley kitchen is often used in small apartments and condos. It is important to remember that you must have at least 42” between the countertops to accommodate opening doors and for single person to move around freely.

PROS
In a small kitchen such as this, you are forced to not have as much clutter and everything to have its place. Prep time may be considerably shorter as you are working in a smaller space with everything at arms length.

CONS
This layout is more ideal for a single person or one cook at a time. Does not allow for entertaining in the kitchen.

You may also like "Interior Design Styles-Design is in the Details"

Tags